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letting nature back in

nature and nurture in suburban spaces

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Wildlife gardening

Diverting and delightful Swee Waxbills

Named for their soft ‘swee swee’ call, the small and colourful Swee waxbills are guaranteed to distract me from my work on their occasional visits to our garden. Continue reading “Diverting and delightful Swee Waxbills”

Arboreal Bridge

Even Tree Lizards needs bridges. What better than a horizontal branch bridging a gap? Continue reading “Arboreal Bridge”

Transitions we rely on

Change is often associated with something unwelcome or even threatening, but the change of seasons that cycle through time is an ongoing process that we and the natural world rely on. Continue reading “Transitions we rely on”

The understorey: The tale of the White Starred Robin

Once upon a time, not long ago and not far away, a White Starred Robin visited our garden pond. If I had the powers to understand the language of robins, what might I learn? Continue reading “The understorey: The tale of the White Starred Robin”

For the birds: Grass going to seed in the autumn garden

Brightening up our mini-grassland this autumn are the seeded plumes of the Golden Bristle Grass. Not only do they catch our eye, but they also catch the attention of seed-eating birds. Continue reading “For the birds: Grass going to seed in the autumn garden”

Dragonfly hawking

Atop a leaf, a dragonfly perches waiting for prey. Continue reading “Dragonfly hawking”

Black-headed Oriole: Golden bird of the African treetops

Here is a bird that lives up to its beautiful namethe word “oriole” derives from the Latin for “golden”. Continue reading “Black-headed Oriole: Golden bird of the African treetops”

Solitude in the suburbs

The images used in letting nature back in are limited to photographs I take in our suburban garden. In response to this week’s photo challenge: “Solitude … show us what being alone means to you”, the question arises, how to convey solitude in the suburbs? Continue reading “Solitude in the suburbs”

Say can I have some of your purple berries?

When I see birds and monkeys enjoying these purple berries, I invariably think of the song “Wooden Ships”. The link between the Waterberry tree (commonly referred to by its Zulu name umDoni) and the song is purple berries. Continue reading “Say can I have some of your purple berries?”

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