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letting nature back in

nature and nurture in suburban spaces

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Indigenous plants

Food for birds and wildlife: Planting for heat and drought

In a hot dry spring many birds and animals are struggling to survive even here in suburbia. However, gardens large and small can help wildlife survive in difficult circumstances, especially when gardens are planted with indigenous (native) plants that provide food and shelter. Continue reading “Food for birds and wildlife: Planting for heat and drought”

Blood-red Acraea butterfly: A complete life cycle in one shrubby tree

The African dog rose is usually admired for its flowers, but it also plays host to many small creatures, including a species of butterfly, enabling it to complete its life cycle from egg to adult. Surprising as it was to find one plant sustaining so much life, it surprised me more that it sustained so much interest in me. Continue reading “Blood-red Acraea butterfly: A complete life cycle in one shrubby tree”

Just pondering: Reflecting on our garden pond

A pond or water feature can add liveliness to even the drabbest of backyards. No, I am not promoting a garden makeover, but thought I’d share something of the enjoyment I get from our garden pond, not least because a variety of wildlife get to enjoy it too. Continue reading “Just pondering: Reflecting on our garden pond”

From winter dormancy to a spring spectacle: the Paintbrush Lily

Spring has definitely arrived when these lilies start flowering. After being dormant throughout the winter, a green spear emerges from the ground to open into this brilliant flower. Continue reading “From winter dormancy to a spring spectacle: the Paintbrush Lily”

Celebrating seediness

 

The meaning of the word “seedy” has come to be associated with being unkempt or shabby, rather than being fruitful or abundant, which was the original meaning of the word, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary. We speak disparagingly of having “gone to seed”, and admiringly of being “in the flower of youth”. Perhaps this comes from the school of thinking that life is linear, rather than the tradition of thinking in terms cycles of life. Continue reading “Celebrating seediness”

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