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letting nature back in

nature and nurture in suburban spaces

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Flowering trees

The beautiful Cape chestnut: Host to the citrus swallowtail butterfly

An African tree renowned for its beauty is the Cape chestnut, which is a larval host plant of the citrus swallowtail butterfly that featured in last week’s post. We are fortunate to have one of these trees at the bottom of the garden and it is mature enough to flower each summer. Continue reading “The beautiful Cape chestnut: Host to the citrus swallowtail butterfly”

Weekly Photo Find: African Dog Rose

Although I have featured this plant before, I thought its flowers decorative enough for another look. The African Dog Rose has elegantly showy flowers. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: African Dog Rose”

Weekly Photo Find: Pink Pompom flower

Another in the series of flower portraits, this is a cluster of flowers of the Dais cotinifolia. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Pink Pompom flower”

Transforming from bud to flower

The buds of the Powderpuff Tree are so tightly clenched that they almost resemble berries. The transformation of the buds unfurling almost one stamen at a time to become flowers is particularly eye-catching. Continue reading “Transforming from bud to flower”

From mountains to gardens: Scarlet flowers that brighten winter drabness

I have always regarded this plant as a mountain dweller, as I first fell in love with it in the Drakensberg mountains in KwaZulu-Natal.  Continue reading “From mountains to gardens: Scarlet flowers that brighten winter drabness”

Transitions we rely on

Change is often associated with something unwelcome or even threatening, but the change of seasons that cycle through time is an ongoing process that we and the natural world rely on. Continue reading “Transitions we rely on”

A fuchsia to depend on: A feast for the eyes and the birds

Known as the Tree fuchsia, because of the shape and colour of its flowers, this plant is adaptable, and can be a multi-stemmed shrub or a huge evergreen tree, depending on its growing conditions. Continue reading “A fuchsia to depend on: A feast for the eyes and the birds”

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