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letting nature back in

nature and nurture in suburban spaces

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Human wildlife interaction

Hadeda ibis: From wetlands to birdbaths

From being primarily associated with wetlands and woodlands the hadeda ibis has successfully expanded its range across much of the country even where it was formerly absent, and nowadays populations flourish even in urban areas. In suburbia it continues its association with water in the form of well-watered lawns, ponds and swimming pools. Continue reading “Hadeda ibis: From wetlands to birdbaths”

Weekly Photo Find: Thoughtful vervet monkey

An apparently thoughtful young vervet monkey photographed while quietly savouring a small fruit on the back deck of our house. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Thoughtful vervet monkey”

Campsite visitors: Bushpigs and other animals

A family of bushpigs were intriguing nocturnal visitors to our camp on our recent trip to KwaZulu-Natal’s Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. At first two females and a baby snuffled around amiably. It was only when the big male arrived that we realised the real reason for their visit. Continue reading “Campsite visitors: Bushpigs and other animals”

Animal interactions at Hluhluwe-iMfolozi wildlife park

I thought I’d share some interesting wildlife interactions between and within species that caught my eye (and camera) on our recent visit to the iMfolozi section of the Hlulhuwe-iMfolozi Park in Zululand. Although the focus of this blog is letting nature back into suburbia,  you might like to share in this recent trip that let suburbanite me back into nature in a less domesticated context.

Continue reading “Animal interactions at Hluhluwe-iMfolozi wildlife park”

Weekly Photo Find: Juvenile Vervet Monkey in the Suburbs

This young Vervet Monkey in all likelihood has a precarious future. She belongs to a troop of monkeys that survives on the fringes of a suburban area that is surrounded by a commercial plantation of eucalyptus trees. She has done well to survive this far as the mortality rate of baby monkeys is high. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Juvenile Vervet Monkey in the Suburbs”

Weekly Photo Find: Wistful Monkey in the Garden

An adult Vervet Monkey looks slight wistful as he watches the rest of the troop moving through the trees on the edge of our garden. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Wistful Monkey in the Garden”

Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey’s Midday Siesta

After a hard morning foraging for food, one of the benefits of high rank is that you can get to choose a prime resting spot. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey’s Midday Siesta”

Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey Portrait

Those who regard Vervet Monkeys as pests probably seldom see monkeys at rest. Any creature that is defensive or afraid does not show its everyday demeanour, which includes calmness, dignity and grace. Continue reading “Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey Portrait”

Say can I have some of your purple berries?

When I see birds and monkeys enjoying these purple berries, I invariably think of the song “Wooden Ships”. The link between the Waterberry tree (commonly referred to by its Zulu name umDoni) and the song is purple berries. Continue reading “Say can I have some of your purple berries?”

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